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A brief about...

History of Achari Masala

Achari masala is a spice blend used in Indian cuisine, particularly in North Indian and Pakistani dishes. The word “achar” translates to “pickle” in Hindi, and the masala is inspired by the flavors and spices commonly used in Indian pickles. It adds a tangy and spicy kick to various dishes.

The exact origin of Achari masala is not well-documented, but it is believed to have originated in the Indian subcontinent, where pickles (achar) have been a part of culinary traditions for centuries. Pickling is a traditional preservation method that involves fermenting or marinating vegetables, fruits, or meat in a mixture of spices, oil, and vinegar or citrus juices. These pickles are known for their bold and tangy flavors, and the masala replicates those flavors in a dry spice form.

Achari masala typically consists of a blend of aromatic spices such as mustard seeds, fennel seeds, cumin seeds, fenugreek seeds, nigella seeds (kalonji), and various other spices. These spices are dry roasted or toasted and then ground together to create the masala blend. The result is a flavorful mixture with a pungent and tangy aroma.

Achari masala is commonly used in a variety of dishes, primarily meat and vegetable preparations. One popular dish is Achari chicken, where chicken pieces are marinated with the masala and other ingredients like yogurt, ginger, garlic, and lime juice. The marinated chicken is then cooked in a spicy and tangy sauce, resulting in a flavorful and aromatic dish.

Another popular dish is Achari paneer, where paneer (Indian cottage cheese) is marinated with Achari masala and cooked with onions, tomatoes, and other spices. The tangy and spicy flavors of the masala complement the creamy and mild taste of the paneer.

Apart from chicken and paneer, Achari masala can also be used with other proteins like lamb, fish, or shrimp. It can even be incorporated into vegetarian dishes like Achari aloo (potatoes) or Achari baingan (eggplant), where the masala adds a tangy and zesty twist.

The versatility of Achari masala allows it to be used in various recipes, giving dishes a distinctive and tangy flavor profile reminiscent of Indian pickles. It highlights the culinary creativity and love for spices in Indian cuisine, providing a unique taste experience to those who enjoy the flavors of the subcontinent.

Achari Masala is my humble take on this iconic spice. Besides being used for BBQ’ing, this sauce can be used to make Achari curries to flavor meats and vegetables alike.